Huge surge in demand for Nuclear Degree Apprenticeships in the north of England

The new schemes are a “game-changer” according to Gen2 Engineering’s CEO, with applications going up from 154 last year to 427 this year.

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Applications for the scheme went up from 154 last year to 427 this year

The new schemes are a “game-changer” according to Gen2 Engineering’s CEO, with applications going up from 154 last year to 427 this year.

An apprenticeship provider in Cumbria has reported three times the number of apprenticeship applications compared with last year.

Among the 3,000 online applications for all apprenticeships starting with Cumbria’s Gen2 this September were over 400 for the new Nuclear Degree Apprenticeship – three times the number of applications the course attracted last year.

Mike Smith, Gen2 Engineering’s chief executive, told the In-Cumbria website: “There is a lot of emphasis placed by the government on recruiting more apprentices but I’m not sure that filters down to the schools in terms of careers options.

“It is in the school’s favour if they can persuade young people to stay on and study A-levels rather than go on an apprenticeship. The new degree apprenticeship is a game-changer.

“Traditionally, you can do an apprenticeship from level two GCSE to a Level 4 or 5 which is the equivalent to an HNC, but now a degree apprenticeship takes you to HND foundation level and to the equivalent of a Bachelor’s degree.

“This is making a lot of employers think about how they can switch from their traditional graduates programme. Our applications for the scheme went up from 154 last year to 427 this year, mainly in nuclear engineering, but also in human resources.”

As the courses become more widely known about there has been increased interest from employers. That has resulted in there being 46 students on the Level six Nuclear degree apprenticeship starting at Gen2 this September compared to the first intake of 19 in January this year.

“The programmes can last for three or five years and involve one day’s study release a week,” said Smith.

“It is good for the student because you are being trained, you are being employed and you are getting a wage and are not racking up student debts. It is a different way of looking at higher education. You get a more rounded individual and it is accelerated learning.”

The five-year Degree Apprenticeship programme leads to an honours degree and includes work experience and in contrast to building up a student debt, participants are paid a salary.

 

"It is in the school’s favour if they can persuade young people to stay on and study A-levels rather than go on an apprenticeship. The new degree apprenticeship is a game-changer."

“This is making a lot of employers think about how they can switch from their traditional graduates programme. Our applications for the scheme went up from 154 last year to 427 this year, mainly in nuclear engineering, but also in human resources.”

As the courses become more widely known about there has been increased interest from employers. That has resulted in there being 46 students on the Level six Nuclear degree apprenticeship starting at Gen2 this September compared to the first intake of 19 in January this year.

“The programmes can last for three or five years and involve one day’s study release a week,” said Smith.

“It is good for the student because you are being trained, you are being employed and you are getting a wage and are not racking up student debts. It is a different way of looking at higher education. You get a more rounded individual and it is accelerated learning.”

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