Under-18s want to be pop stars not politicians

Just 3% of the under-18-year-olds cited prime minister or president as their first choice of job when they are older, compared to 18% who aim for singing stardom as solo singers or as members of a band.

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Prime minister came at the bottom of the list.

Young people in Britain today would much prefer to be pop stars than politicians, according to recent research.  

The national survey quizzed 2,000 young people, who placed the top job in politics and power at the very bottom of their future ambitions lists.

Just 3% of the under-18-year-olds cited prime minister or president as their first choice of job when they are older, compared to 18% who aim for singing stardom as solo singers or as members of a band.

The survey did highlight considerable scientific ambition too, however, as 15% say they want to become a scientist who makes a famous discovery.

A spokesperson from ACS International Schools – which commissioned the survey to coincide with the opening of a new Science Centre at its Hillingdon school – welcomed the interest shown by young people in both the creative arts and science:

“It’s heartening to see this fairly even split across art and science subjects amongst our young people which bodes well for the future. However, the sharp rejection of politics is worrying.

“While political careers are often forged later in life, it would seem that young people are perhaps being discouraged or put off by the political uncertainty they are seeing at the moment.”

The poll also revealed that 15% of young people aspire to be a famous actor or actress, while 14% would like to be a famous athlete or sports star. 9% would like to be an astronaut, and the same number a brilliant surgeon or doctor.

The poll also revealed that 15% of young people aspire to be a famous actor or actress, while 14% would like to be a famous athlete or sports star. 9% would like to be an astronaut, and the same number a brilliant surgeon or doctor.

Boys are more interested than girls in becoming an astronaut (11% compared to 8%); a doctor (11% compared to 7%); or a famous athlete or sports star (15% compared to 13%).

Girls are more interested in becoming a scientist who makes a famous discovery (16% compared to 13%); or a famous actor (15% compared to 13%).

There is little difference between genders when considering the prime minister’s job (3%); or becoming a famous singer or band member (18%).

A spokesperson for ACS International Schools concluded: “While you would expect an emphasis by young people on fame and fortune achieved via the creative industries, the extent of interest in the sciences as a career choice is very encouraging too. They also seem to have a realistic grasp on the qualities needed to succeed in their chosen field.

“The survey will perhaps make less encouraging reading for our world leaders who could do well to ponder its findings and consider the current impact being made by politics on future generations of voters of voters.”

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